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Diet Vs Diet

Americans spend tens of billions of dollars a year in their quest for losing weight, and getting fit. As I’ve said before, there are a number of different approaches to dieting, and a number of these approaches will produce results. The key is in finding an approach that works for YOU, and one you can be CONSISTENT with.

Listed here, for you, are some of the most popular diets available today, some information about them, and the results of some studies done by some of the top universities in the country. The studies followed groups of people following one of the specific diets listed, and compared the weight loss results of each group of dieters after extended periods of time. So which diet will shed the most pounds after a year? Keep on reading to find out…the results may surprise you!

The Diets:

Atkins Diet (low carb)
A high protein diet, encourages some form of meat at every meal, and restricts carbohydrates.
Calorie Breakdown:
20% Carbs
30% Protein
50% Fat

Weight Watchers (low fat)
Emphasizes portion control. Encourages grains, fruits, vegetables, and modest servings of meat.
Calorie Breakdown:
50% Carbs
20% Protein
30% Fat

Zone Diet
40/30/30 ratio theoretically stabilizes hormones that trigger hunger and weight gain.
Calorie Breakdown:
40% Carbs
30% Protein
30% Fat

Mediterranean Diet
Prescribes grains, vegetables, and sources of healthy fats such as olive oil and nuts.
Calorie Breakdown:
45% Carbs
20% Protein
35% Fat

Ornish Diet (Low fat vegetarian)
Recommends eliminating nuts, meat, and fish.
Calorie Breakdown:
70% Carbs
10% Fat


Low Carb vs. Low Fat vs. Mediterranean

Pounds lost at six months: Low carb 14 lbs, WW 10lbs, Mediterranean 10 lbs

Final loss (two years): Low carb 12 lbs, WW 7 lbs, Mediterranean 10 lbs

Low Carb vs. Low Fat vs. Zone vs. Ornish

Pounds lost at six months: Low carb 14 lbs, WW 9 lbs, Zone 6 lbs, Ornish 6 lbs

Final loss (one year): Low carb 10, WW 6 lbs, Zone 4 lbs, Ornish 5 lbs

Low Fat vs. Exercise

Pounds lost at six weeks: WW 6 lbs, Exercise 2 lbs

Final loss (three months): WW 9 lbs, Exercise 3 lbs

So what does this mean for you?

Well, by looking at the numbers, you can see that all of the diets produced results. And, with the exception of the subjects following the Mediterranean diet, the dieters tended to gain some of the weight they had lost back over the long term. This is most likely because they failed to follow the diet as strictly over time as they had in the beginning.

This is a problem most dieters have with most diets…consistency. Everyone charges out of the gate ready to cut down on carbs, fat, or to consume the magic ratio, only to find that after a period of time this way of eating is something they can’t maintain over the long term. It’s not a change they’re willing to make with the rest of their life.

My advice to you is the same as always…choose something that’s right for YOU. Choose foods you like, eliminate the refined ones, and consume in MODERATION in combination with EXERCISE. The above diets work because they control the amount, and in most cases, the type of food being eaten. As should be evident from the results, the control part is much more important than the type of food being eaten.

So take control of what you eat. If one of theses diets works for you, then GREAT! Pick it, and stick with it. If none of them float your boat, no problem. Choose the foods that work for you, control how much you eat, and be consistent. Combine your efforts with some exercise, commit to sticking with it for at least a year, and watch what happens.

James Steffy, CSCS

Mental Skill Vs Physical Skill

Mental Skill Vs Physical Skill

Both body and mind are needed to carry out any given task in a fruitful manner.They should be taken care of by every conscious individual who wants to lead a meaningful life.Mental skill is very much needed to improve organizational expertize.but with out taking care of the body we can not have a healthy mind.If body becomes sick then mental energy will also erode,because the physical illness will affect us psychically.So our motto should be to stay healthy both physically and mentally.Body and mind should run parallel.They should be taken care of all the time.While mantaining external purity attention should also be given to improve internal purity.A pure mind and a chaste brain have tremendous capacity and can acheive manythings.

Mental skill-In every organization,family and society mental skill is  very much essential.It is nrrded to deal with people and keep a good and long lasting relationship with the customers.Mental expertise will help us to learn and know about the functioning of an organization and if we develop mental skill we can have technical expertise.From the very beginning of the childhood attention should be given in developing mental skills of the students by developing various techniques.Student should be able to judge their minds and learn how to apply their mind in fruitful endeavour to accomplish any task.By developing a well devised methodology we can have tremendous mental skill.Once we aquire mental skill in all areas of life most of our fatigue,tension,frustrations and despairs will be over and we will lead a happy and contented life.

Physical skill-We should  also have physical skill.Simultaneously with the mental labour we should be able to do physical labour like gardening,cooking,washing our clothes and decorating the house.This will enhance the relationship between husband and wife.We will also feel independent and more confident.This will satisfy us and we will feel mentally contented.In order to keep the body in perfect order daily excercise,yoga and morning walk are prescribed by various health experts.We should take advantage of those methods to stay healthy,because a healthy body gives rise to healthy mind.

Body and mind-Body and mind should run parallel..We should see that we are healthy both physically and mentally,because both are needed to carry out a given task.Body and mind are related One affects the other.So both should remain in perfect order so that we can enjoy the beauty of life.Remaining healthy both physically and mentally we will contribute more to our family,organization and society.This will also keep us in harmony and in a pleasant mood always.

Developing mental skill-We can develop mental skill by various methods.Mental meditation is the most suitable method to develop mental skill.By repeating Lord’s name daily in the morning and evening over a considerable span of time many undesirable thoughts are flushed out from our mind and positive,vibrant and invigorating thoughts take their place energising the mind.We become able to carry out our tasks without fatigue,tension and boredom.There are many other methods by which we can develop mental skill.By practising pranayama,dynamic power breathing and crstal gazing we can aquire trememdous mental energy and aquire mental skills in all areas of life.

Developing physical skill-We can develop physical skill by daily excercise,yoga,morning walk and gymnasium.We should take good and nutritious diet suitable to our body.For this we should refer books of great authors who have given expert advice on our food habbits and we can mantain good physical health.We should be vegans inorder to have a sound body and avoid spicy foods.We should increase consumption of raw foods and various fruits.Our body is an instrument meant to do good works So misuse of sense organs will adversly affect oue physical well being.

Going beyond body,mind and intellect-We should go beyond body and it’s various passions,mind and it’s lust,intellect and it’s restlessness.We should have perfect control over our body,mind and intellect.We should not hear the unusual demand of our sense organs.We should go beyond and stay in a state of elevated consciousness so as to have full command over our external and internal activities.We should have a developed state of consciousness and always remaininging in that state we can better judge ourselves and our activities and can have full command over our life.Our life is in our hand.Going beyond body,mind and intellect we can perfectly manage various aspects of life.We should also be able to think outside of the box.

Meditation and excercise-These two are the most powerful tools to keep ourselves healthy both mentally and physically.By constant practice of meditation we can develop tremendous powers of concentration which is the most powerful weapon to have a vibrant mental skill.More over we can make our mind one pointed and focused.When all the rays of mind are focused on a given task the mind ignites and we become able to acheive that task within no time.We can take the example of sunrays.When the sunrays are passed through a convex lens they are converged to a point and can burn anything that falls infront of them.Such is the power of a concentrated and focused mind.By daily doses of excercise we can have a perfect body and our mind will also remain alert.By walking a mile or two in the first rays of the sun in the morning we can have a perfect breathing.We will breathe clean air outside.This will keep us healthy both physically and mentally.

Application of mind and body-We should develop healthy body and mind and should apply them in carrying out our given tasks.We should apply our healthy body and healthy mind in fruitful works so that we can have a meaningful life.

Conservation of energy-We should conserve our physical and mental energy.We should not allow our mind to run after baseless thoughts.We should fill it with positive vibrations from the universe and should not allow it to run after mundane things.We should also restrain our body from indulgence in excessive sensual pleasures and unfruitful works.

Both our body and mind are necessary to keep us always in a state of harmony and in perfect unision with the universal forces.So we should have sound body and mind to aquire physical and mental skills respectively.Then we can remain in perfect tune with the universal forces and can acheive our dreams and reach our goals soon.









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Army Photography Contest – 2007 – FMWRC – Arts and Crafts – A Plumpish Proportion
Exercise program
Image by familymwr
Army Photography Contest – 2007 – FMWRC – Arts and Crafts – A Plumpish Proportion

Photo By: SSG Robert Stewart

To learn more about the annual U.S. Army Photography Competition, visit us online at www.armymwr.com

U.S. Army Arts and Crafts History

After World War I the reductions to the Army left the United States with a small force. The War Department faced monumental challenges in preparing for World War II. One of those challenges was soldier morale. Recreational activities for off duty time would be important. The arts and crafts program informally evolved to augment the needs of the War Department.
On January 9, 1941, the Secretary of War, Henry L. Stimson, appointed Frederick H. Osborn, a prominent U.S. businessman and philanthropist, Chairman of the War Department Committee on Education, Recreation and Community Service.
In 1940 and 1941, the United States involvement in World War II was more of sympathy and anticipation than of action. However, many different types of institutions were looking for ways to help the war effort. The Museum of Modern Art in New York was one of these institutions. In April, 1941, the Museum announced a poster competition, “Posters for National Defense.” The directors stated “The Museum feels that in a time of national emergency the artists of a country are as important an asset as men skilled in other fields, and that the nation’s first-rate talent should be utilized by the government for its official design work… Discussions have been held with officials of the Army and the Treasury who have expressed remarkable enthusiasm…”
In May 1941, the Museum exhibited “Britain at War”, a show selected by Sir Kenneth Clark, director of the National Gallery in London. The “Prize-Winning Defense Posters” were exhibited in July through September concurrently with “Britain at War.” The enormous overnight growth of the military force meant mobilization type construction at every camp. Construction was fast; facilities were not fancy; rather drab and depressing.
In 1941, the Fort Custer Army Illustrators, while on strenuous war games maneuvers in Tennessee, documented the exercise The Bulletin of the Museum of Modern Art, Vol. 9, No. 3 (Feb. 1942), described their work. “Results were astonishingly good; they showed serious devotion …to the purpose of depicting the Army scene with unvarnished realism and a remarkable ability to capture this scene from the soldier’s viewpoint. Civilian amateur and professional artists had been transformed into soldier-artists. Reality and straightforward documentation had supplanted (replaced) the old romantic glorification and false dramatization of war and the slick suavity (charm) of commercial drawing.”

“In August of last year, Fort Custer Army Illustrators held an exhibition, the first of its kind in the new Army, at the Camp Service Club. Soldiers who saw the exhibition, many of whom had never been inside an art gallery, enjoyed it thoroughly. Civilian visitors, too, came and admired. The work of the group showed them a new aspect of the Army; there were many phases of Army life they had never seen or heard of before. Newspapers made much of it and, most important, the Army approved. Army officials saw that it was not only authentic material, but that here was a source of enlivenment (vitalization) to the Army and a vivid medium for conveying the Army’s purposes and processes to civilians and soldiers.”
Brigadier General Frederick H. Osborn and War Department leaders were concerned because few soldiers were using the off duty recreation areas that were available. Army commanders recognized that efficiency is directly correlated with morale, and that morale is largely determined from the manner in which an individual spends his own free time. Army morale enhancement through positive off duty recreation programs is critical in combat staging areas.
To encourage soldier use of programs, the facilities drab and uninviting environment had to be improved. A program utilizing talented artists and craftsmen to decorate day rooms, mess halls, recreation halls and other places of general assembly was established by the Facilities Section of Special Services. The purpose was to provide an environment that would reflect the military tradition, accomplishments and the high standard of army life. The fact that this work was to be done by the men themselves had the added benefit of contributing to the esprit de corps (teamwork, or group spirit) of the unit.
The plan was first tested in October of 1941, at Camp Davis, North Carolina. A studio workshop was set up and a group of soldier artists were placed on special duty to design and decorate the facilities. Additionally, evening recreation art classes were scheduled three times a week. A second test was established at Fort Belvoir, Virginia a month later. The success of these programs lead to more installations requesting the program.
After Pearl Harbor was bombed, the Museum of Modern Art appointed Mr. James Soby, to the position of Director of the Armed Service Program on January 15, 1942. The subsequent program became a combination of occupational therapy, exhibitions and morale-sustaining activities.
Through the efforts of Mr. Soby, the museum program included; a display of Fort Custer Army Illustrators work from February through April 5, 1942. The museum also included the work of soldier-photographers in this exhibit. On May 6, 1942, Mr. Soby opened an art sale of works donated by museum members. The sale was to raise funds for the Soldier Art Program of Special Services Division. The bulk of these proceeds were to be used to provide facilities and materials for soldier artists in Army camps throughout the country.
Members of the Museum had responded with paintings, sculptures, watercolors, gouaches, drawings, etchings and lithographs. Hundreds of works were received, including oils by Winslow Homer, Orozco, John Kane, Speicher, Eilshemius, de Chirico; watercolors by Burchfield and Dufy; drawings by Augustus John, Forain and Berman, and prints by Cezanne, Lautrec, Matisse and Bellows. The War Department plan using soldier-artists to decorate and improve buildings and grounds worked. Many artists who had been drafted into the Army volunteered to paint murals in waiting rooms and clubs, to decorate dayrooms, and to landscape grounds. For each artist at work there were a thousand troops who watched. These bystanders clamored to participate, and classes in drawing, painting, sculpture and photography were offered. Larger working space and more instructors were required to meet the growing demand. Civilian art instructors and local communities helped to meet this cultural need, by providing volunteer instruction and facilities.
Some proceeds from the Modern Museum of Art sale were used to print 25,000 booklets called “Interior Design and Soldier Art.” The booklet showed examples of soldier-artist murals that decorated places of general assembly. It was a guide to organizing, planning and executing the soldier-artist program. The balance of the art sale proceeds were used to purchase the initial arts and crafts furnishings for 350 Army installations in the USA.
In November, 1942, General Somervell directed that a group of artists be selected and dispatched to active theaters to paint war scenes with the stipulation that soldier artists would not paint in lieu of military duties.
Aileen Osborn Webb, sister of Brigadier General Frederick H. Osborn, launched the American Crafts Council in 1943. She was an early champion of the Army program.
While soldiers were participating in fixed facilities in the USA, many troops were being shipped overseas to Europe and the Pacific (1942-1945). They had long periods of idleness and waiting in staging areas. At that time the wounded were lying in hospitals, both on land and in ships at sea. The War Department and Red Cross responded by purchasing kits of arts and crafts tools and supplies to distribute to “these restless personnel.” A variety of small “Handicraft Kits” were distributed free of charge. Leathercraft, celluloid etching, knotting and braiding, metal tooling, drawing and clay modeling are examples of the types of kits sent.
In January, 1944, the Interior Design Soldier Artist program was more appropriately named the “Arts and Crafts Section” of Special Services. The mission was “to fulfill the natural human desire to create, provide opportunities for self-expression, serve old skills and develop new ones, and assist the entire recreation program through construction work, publicity, and decoration.”
The National Army Art Contest was planned for the late fall of 1944. In June of 1945, the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C., for the first time in its history opened its facilities for the exhibition of the soldier art and photography submitted to this contest. The “Infantry Journal, Inc.” printed a small paperback booklet containing 215 photographs of pictures exhibited in the National Gallery of Art.
In August of 1944, the Museum of Modern Art, Armed Forces Program, organized an art center for veterans. Abby Rockefeller, in particular, had a strong interest in this project. Soldiers were invited to sketch, paint, or model under the guidance of skilled artists and craftsmen. Victor d’Amico, who was in charge of the Museum’s Education Department, was quoted in Russell Lynes book, Good Old Modern: An Intimate Portrait of the Museum of Modern Art. “I asked one fellow why he had taken up art and he said, Well, I just came back from destroying everything. I made up my mind that if I ever got out of the Army and out of the war I was never going to destroy another thing in my life, and I decided that art was the thing that I would do.” Another man said to d’Amico, “Art is like a good night’s sleep. You come away refreshed and at peace.”
In late October, 1944, an Arts and Crafts Branch of Special Services Division, Headquarters, European Theater of Operations was established. A versatile program of handcrafts flourished among the Army occupation troops.
The increased interest in crafts, rather than fine arts, at this time lead to a new name for the program: The “Handicrafts Branch.”
In 1945, the War Department published a new manual, “Soldier Handicrafts”, to help implement this new emphasis. The manual contained instructions for setting up crafts facilities, selecting as well as improvising tools and equipment, and basic information on a variety of arts and crafts.
As the Army moved from a combat to a peacetime role, the majority of crafts shops in the United States were equipped with woodworking power machinery for construction of furnishings and objects for personal living. Based on this new trend, in 1946 the program was again renamed, this time as “Manual Arts.”
At the same time, overseas programs were now employing local artists and craftsmen to operate the crafts facilities and instruct in a variety of arts and crafts. These highly skilled, indigenous instructors helped to stimulate the soldiers’ interest in the respective native cultures and artifacts. Thousands of troops overseas were encouraged to record their experiences on film. These photographs provided an invaluable means of communication between troops and their families back home.
When the war ended, the Navy had a firm of architects and draftsmen on contract to design ships. Since there was no longer a need for more ships, they were given a new assignment: To develop a series of instructional guides for arts and crafts. These were called “Hobby Manuals.” The Army was impressed with the quality of the Navy manuals and had them reprinted and adopted for use by Army troops. By 1948, the arts and crafts practiced throughout the Army were so varied and diverse that the program was renamed “Hobby Shops.” The first “Interservice Photography Contest” was held in 1948. Each service is eligible to send two years of their winning entries forward for the bi-annual interservice contest. In 1949, the first All Army Crafts Contest was also held. Once again, it was clear that the program title, “Hobby Shops” was misleading and overlapped into other forms of recreation.
In January, 1951, the program was designated as “The Army Crafts Program.” The program was recognized as an essential Army recreation activity along with sports, libraries, service clubs, soldier shows and soldier music. In the official statement of mission, professional leadership was emphasized to insure a balanced, progressive schedule of arts and crafts would be conducted in well-equipped, attractive facilities on all Army installations.
The program was now defined in terms of a “Basic Seven Program” which included: drawing and painting; ceramics and sculpture; metal work; leathercrafts; model building; photography and woodworking. These programs were to be conducted regularly in facilities known as the “multiple-type crafts shop.” For functional reasons, these facilities were divided into three separate technical areas for woodworking, photography and the arts and crafts.
During the Korean Conflict, the Army Crafts program utilized the personnel and shops in Japan to train soldiers to instruct crafts in Korea.
The mid-1950s saw more soldiers with cars and the need to repair their vehicles was recognized at Fort Carson, Colorado, by the craft director. Soldiers familiar with crafts shops knew that they had tools and so automotive crafts were established. By 1958, the Engineers published an Official Design Guide on Crafts Shops and Auto Crafts Shops. In 1959, the first All Army Art Contest was held. Once more, the Army Crafts Program responded to the needs of soldiers.
In the 1960’s, the war in Vietnam was a new challenge for the Army Crafts Program. The program had three levels of support; fixed facilities, mobile trailers designed as portable photo labs, and once again a “Kit Program.” The kit program originated at Headquarters, Department of Army, and it proved to be very popular with soldiers.
Tom Turner, today a well-known studio potter, was a soldier at Ft. Jackson, South Carolina in the 1960s. In the December 1990 / January 1991 “American Crafts” magazine, Turner, who had been a graduate student in art school when he was drafted, said the program was “a godsend.”
The Army Artist Program was re-initiated in cooperation with the Office of Military History to document the war in Vietnam. Soldier-artists were identified and teams were formed to draw and paint the events of this combat. Exhibitions of these soldier-artist works were produced and toured throughout the USA.
In 1970, the original name of the program, “Arts and Crafts”, was restored. In 1971, the “Arts and Crafts/Skills Development Program” was established for budget presentations and construction projects.
After the Vietnam demobilization, a new emphasis was placed on service to families and children of soldiers. To meet this new challenge in an environment of funding constraints the arts and crafts program began charging fees for classes. More part-time personnel were used to teach formal classes. Additionally, a need for more technical-vocational skills training for military personnel was met by close coordination with Army Education Programs. Army arts and crafts directors worked with soldiers during “Project Transition” to develop soldier skills for new careers in the public sector.
The main challenge in the 1980s and 90s was, and is, to become “self-sustaining.” Directors have been forced to find more ways to generate increased revenue to help defray the loss of appropriated funds and to cover the non-appropriated funds expenses of the program. Programs have added and increased emphasis on services such as, picture framing, gallery sales, engraving and trophy sales, etc… New programs such as multi-media computer graphics appeal to customers of the 1990’s.
The Gulf War presented the Army with some familiar challenges such as personnel off duty time in staging areas. Department of Army volunteer civilian recreation specialists were sent to Saudi Arabia in January, 1991, to organize recreation programs. Arts and crafts supplies were sent to the theater. An Army Humor Cartoon Contest was conducted for the soldiers in the Gulf, and arts and crafts programs were set up to meet soldier interests.
The increased operations tempo of the ‘90’s Army has once again placed emphasis on meeting the “recreation needs of deployed soldiers.” Arts and crafts activities and a variety of programs are assets commanders must have to meet the deployment challenges of these very different scenarios.
The Army arts and crafts program, no matter what it has been titled, has made some unique contributions for the military and our society in general. Army arts and crafts does not fit the narrow definition of drawing and painting or making ceramics, but the much larger sense of arts and crafts. It is painting and drawing. It also encompasses:
* all forms of design. (fabric, clothes, household appliances, dishes, vases, houses, automobiles, landscapes, computers, copy machines, desks, industrial machines, weapon systems, air crafts, roads, etc…)
* applied technology (photography, graphics, woodworking, sculpture, metal smithing, weaving and textiles, sewing, advertising, enameling, stained glass, pottery, charts, graphs, visual aides and even formats for correspondence…)
* a way of making learning fun, practical and meaningful (through the process of designing and making an object the creator must decide which materials and techniques to use, thereby engaging in creative problem solving and discovery) skills taught have military applications.
* a way to acquire quality items and save money by doing-it-yourself (making furniture, gifts, repairing things …).
* a way to pursue college credit, through on post classes.
* a universal and non-verbal language (a picture is worth a thousand words).
* food for the human psyche, an element of morale that allows for individual expression (freedom).
* the celebration of human spirit and excellence (our highest form of public recognition is through a dedicated monument).
* physical and mental therapy (motor skill development, stress reduction, etc…).
* an activity that promotes self-reliance and self-esteem.
* the record of mankind, and in this case, of the Army.
What would the world be like today if this generally unknown program had not existed? To quantitatively state the overall impact of this program on the world is impossible. Millions of soldier citizens have been directly and indirectly exposed to arts and crafts because this program existed. One activity, photography can provide a clue to its impact. Soldiers encouraged to take pictures, beginning with WW II, have shared those images with family and friends. Classes in “How to Use a Camera” to “How to Develop Film and Print Pictures” were instrumental in soldiers seeing the results of using quality equipment. A good camera and lens could make a big difference in the quality of the print. They bought the top of the line equipment. When they were discharged from the Army or home on leave this new equipment was showed to the family and friends. Without this encouragement and exposure to photography many would not have recorded their personal experiences or known the difference quality equipment could make. Families and friends would not have had the opportunity to “see” the environment their soldier was living in without these photos. Germany, Italy, Korea, Japan, Panama, etc… were far away places that most had not visited.
As the twenty first century approaches, the predictions for an arts renaissance by Megatrends 2000 seem realistic based on the Army Arts and Crafts Program practical experience. In the April ‘95 issue of “American Demographics” magazine, an article titled “Generation X” fully supports that this is indeed the case today. Television and computers have greatly contributed to “Generation X” being more interested in the visual arts and crafts.
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Organic Food Nutrition

organic food


As Americans become more and more savvy about natural ways to boost health and wellness, the organic food industry is enjoying unprecedented growth.


According to the Organic Farming Research Foundation there are more than 11,000 certified organic producers in the U.S. today compared to 2500 in 1999. 


About 70 percent of Americans buy organic food occasionally and nearly one quarter buy it every week, according to a recent survey conducted by the Hartman Group. 


While some buy organic to support its environmentally friendly practices, most are trying to cut their exposure to chemicals in the foods they eat.


Studies have linked pesticides in our food to a host of health problems including headaches, miscarriage, birth defects, nervous system disorders and asthma.


According to the National Academy of Sciences, chemical pesticides have the potential to cause an additional 1.4 million cases of cancer in this generation of Americans.


Who knows how much that will cost in tears and suffering, notwithstanding the potential bill to the nation’s taxpayers under Obamacare?


Organic Nutritional Advantages

 A study conducted at Rutgers University concluded that, on average, organically grown foods have an 87 percent higher concentration of magnesium, potassium, iron and copper. Organic tomatoes were found to yield 500 percent more calcium than conventionally produced tomatoes.


To classify a food as organic, it must have been grown without the use of harmful synthetic chemical pesticides and fertilizers and must be produced on a farmland that has been free of such chemicals for at least three years.


Feeding the soil with organic matter instead of ammonia and other synthetic fertilizers has been proven to increase the nutrients in produce, resulting in foods with higher levels of vitamins and minerals.



Higher Costs Explained

 Organic foods generally cost more but they can be well worth the extra money, considering the higher nutritional values they deliver.


Another cost factor: Organic farmers don’t receive federal subsidies like traditional farmers; therefore, the price of organic food reflects the true costs of growing and delivering.


Organic farms also tend to be smaller and more labor intensive. (Bear in mind that the price of conventional food does not reflect the cost of environmental cleanups that we pay for through our tax dollars.)



Tasting the Organic Difference

 Locally grown organic food is said to be superior in terms of taste and freshness by enthusiastically loyal consumers who disdain the commercially grown crops in the markets.


Considering that most U.S. grown produce is picked up four to seven days before being placed on supermarket shelves, and is shipped from an average distance of 1500 miles before being sold, certainly the quality of taste can suffer.


And since much of the produce available in supermarket chains is imported from Mexico, Asia, Canada, South America and other countries, the time from harvest to market is greatly extended even longer, costing nutritional value as well as taste.



The Bigger Cause

 In addition to providing superior nutritional benefits to humans, organic foods are also better for the health of Mother Nature. 


Organic foods promote sustainability by establishing an ecological balance to prevent problems with soil fertility such as those prevalent in most soil used by mega farms.


Additionally, from a long term perspective, organic farms actually conserve energy and further protect the environment by maintaining ecological harmony in a truly local sense of the word.



Support Your Local Grower

 You are encouraged to do some research to find out where you can find locally grown produce in your area. It makes good table sense to eat seasonably and by doing so, supporting your local organic farmers market on a year-round basis. 


Buying from your local farmers market, produce or fruit stand also has the added benefit of contributing much-needed dollars to the local economy, as well as providing you and your family an opportunity to make new friends.


While today’s down economy is putting a damper on organic food sales growth, it only serves us better to know that local farmers markets and independent growers provide us with a thrifty and healthy alternative to the commercial organics currently sold in supermarkets.


And considering the fact these fresh local products can cost you so much less, you best be putting local organic farmers and growers on your grocery to-do list today!


David Flores is a natural health researcher for Institute for Vibrant Living, a leading source for all-natural supplements, vitamins, and minerals for many health and nutrition challenges.  To learn more about the products offered by the Institute for Vibrant Living visit http://www.ivlproducts.com


If you found this helpful you might like to visit http://www.theivl.org where you’ll find more free healthy living articles to help improve your health today.


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Fitness is defined as the quality or state of being fit. Around 1950, perhaps consistent with the Industrial Revolution and the treatise of World War II, the term “fitness” increased in western vernacular by a factor of ten. Modern definition of fitness describe either a person or machine’s ability to perform a specific function or a holistic definition of human adaptability to cope with various situations. This has led to an interrelation of human fitness and attractiveness which has mobilized global fitness and fitness equipment industries. Regarding specific function, fitness is attributed to person who possess significant aerobic or anaerobic ability, i.e. strength or endurance. A holistic definition of fitness is described by Greg Glassman in the CrossFit journal as an increased work capacity across broad times and modal domains; mastery of several attributes of fitness including strength, endurance, power, speed, balance and coordination and being able to improve the amount of work done in a given time with any of these domains. A well rounded fitness program will improve a person in all aspects of fitness, rather than one, such as only cardio/respiratory endurance or only weight training.

Before the industrial revolution, fitness was defined as the capacity to carry out the day’s activities without undue fatigue. However, with automation and changes in lifestyles physical fitness is now considered a measure of the body’s ability to function efficiently and effectively in work and leisure activities, to be healthy, to resist hypokinetic diseases, and to meet emergency situations.

A comprehensive fitness program tailored to an individual typically focuses on one or more specific skills, and on age- or health-related needs such as bone health. Many sources also cite mental, social and emotional health as an important part of overall fitness. This is often presented in textbooks as a triangle made up of three points, which represent physical, emotional, and mental fitness. Physical fitness can also prevent or treat many chronic health conditions brought on by unhealthy lifestyle or aging. Working out can also help some people sleep better and possibly alleviate some mood disorders in certain individuals.

Street workout is a physical activity performed mostly in outdoor parks or public facilities. It originated in Ancient Greece, but became a popular movement in Russia, Eastern Europe, and the United States, especially in New York City’s urban neighborhoods. It has now spread all over the world. It is a combination of athletics, calisthenics, and sports. Street workout is a modern name for bodyweight workouts in outdoor parks. Street workout teams and organized competitions exist.

A typical street workout routine often consists of physical exercises such as pull-ups, chin-ups, push-ups, dips, muscle-ups, sit-ups and squats. Street workout also involves some static (isometric) holds such as the human flag, front lever, back lever and planche.

Athletics exercising – a system of exercises with various levels of exertion provided for health strengthening, development of strength and stamina, as well as, for shaping an athletic constitution. Athletics exercising is used to increase strength level, develop physical shape and for rehabilitation.
Isometric exercises – a type of strength training whereby you hold a static position.

Calisthenics (Kalestenos) – is a complex of many simple exercises which are performed using purely body weight. The aim of these exercises is to train muscularity strength and to evolve comprehensive fitness.

Urban Calisthenics – a form of body weight exercise performed with no or little apparatus. Individuals and/or groups train and exercise in urban areas and spaces. Advanced Urban Calisthenics skills include Muscle Up’s, Typewriter pull ups and both Front and Back Levers.
Street workouts are usually performed outdoor or in specifically designed street workout parks. A typical street workout park looks like a play ground with a soft underground and consists of several bars, poles and other objects used for body weight exercises.

► Sport Motivation: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmw9rXTuLboDbX9O8U1zAm8pfGiwmc-3L
► Street Workout, Calisthenics: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmw9rXTuLboCBzw0fnKl0tKmu8vciNXme
► Bodybuilding & Fitness: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmw9rXTuLboBXEYX0WDCov4Iq3wIGrFn3

Cool Fitness images

Some cool Fitness images:

San fitness model.
Image by TerryGeorge.
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Image by benwebboz

Zumba college lifestyles
Image by oklanica

Cool Fitness images

Some cool Fitness images:

#hiking #fitness #outdoors #adventure
Image by Bautz Adventure

sony ericsson fitness app
Image by kalleboo

077_365_Halfway back

Some cool Exercise images:

077_365_Halfway back
Image by MichaelKuhn_pics
I am so glad to be able to do this!

I really like to exercise for both mental and physical fitness. Currently, my two primary forms of exercise have been yoga and swimming. However, for about the past two months, my back has been hurting quite a bit and I have not been doing my normal yoga. I have been to a chiropractor the past 3 weeks and we have made good progress. Today is the first day I am able to really get some good movement.

It feels good to touch the floor and break a little sweat. Prior to my back problems, I was just starting to get my feet past the edges of the mat, so still some work to go, but this does feel good.

Image by CCFoodTravel.com

Exercise III
Image by Katidjah

Scitec Nutrition Wall of Protein at FIBO 2013

A few nice Fitness images I found:

Scitec Nutrition Wall of Protein at FIBO 2013
Image by HealthGauge

Image by Scott Marley Photography

Image by rondostar